Critical Reflections on (In)equality and Justice

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A Fair Allocation of the Costs of Precarious Employment: A Proposal for Europe

Never in human history has wage income been so fragile and transitory. Even if precariousness were to be considered as, all things considered, desirable (or at least inevitable), it would have to be regarded as a negative externality of economic and technological development, and as such it should raise a problem of justice concerning the distribution of costs vis-a-vis benefits of cooperation. I will therefore argue that the main problem of those people who lack a fixed-term job, at least in Europe, is that they live as precarious workers in a world which is still designed for permanent workers.

Winning essay in the category young scholars of the Future Markets Consultation essay contest

Is It Time to Rethink Quotas?

This paper examines the labor market, and argues that quotas should increasingly be used in the hiring process. At a time when more women than ever before are leaving the labor market due to imposed shutdowns stated to combat COVID-19, as well as persistent economic inequality between white people and ethnic minorities, together with the fact that an entire generation of young people have had their grades and education disrupted or stopped because of the pandemic, the allocation of jobs in many sectors can no longer be left to the market mechanism. The use of quotas to ensure that every segment of the community is in gainful employment is therefore recommended and is aligned with the concept of “inclusive development”.

Nominated essay in the category young scholars of the Future Markets Consultation essay contest

Rethinking Our Rights to Resources

If you find a seashell on the beach, it means that you may keep it. This is a thought that many may find natural. For the same reason we may not object to a company that uses machines to collect a lot of seashells at once, especially because the company invested in buying the machines and the labor required to operate the machines. But what if the company prevents others from collecting seashells? Should not everyone have the same right to collect seashells? Assuming such equal rights to resources has significant implications for how the current economy is organized and I argue that rethinking this organization may help to address both the challenge of wealth inequality and several ecological challenges.

Nominated essay in the category young scholars of the Future Markets Consultation essay contest

Laissez-Concurrencer!

The 21st century presents challenges that the European market economy seems unable to resolve, sowing dissatisfaction and opening the door for populists and authoritarian forces. To address these challenges, we must change our conception of the market economy and its relation to the state. Free markets will not miraculously solve or even address pressing issues. Instead of free markets, we must ensure competitive markets; instead of a value-free economy, we must embrace a normative economy that explicitly directs competitive markets towards the issues most pressing to European citizens.

Nominated essay in the category young scholars of the Future Markets Consultation essay contest

Renewing the Welfare State; Panel Discussion & Presentation of Report on 29 April

Various innovative ideas, such as an unconditional universal basic income, job guarantee and universal basic services, today seem less radical and utopian than they used to be. But should we put our faith fully in one of these options, seeing it as a silver bullet solution to all of our problems? Or should we, instead, advocate for an innovative combination that brings together the strengths of different ideas? During an online event on 29 April Sam de Muijnck (chairman of the Think Tank of Young Economists of the Future Markets Consultation) will present his report, followed by a panel discussion.

Perspectives and Elections – Towards a Future-Proof and Valuable Society

With its recently published manifesto, Springtij wants to give a significant push to the shift towards a future-proof Netherlands. It is a political manifesto that is meant to be apolitical; Springtij points to ideas “that transcend party political positions. Ideas and solutions that do not divide society but strengthen it.” The Springtij manifesto is built around four ‘environments’: living & working environment, agricultural & natural environment, industrial environment, and great waters & sea. The changes described in the manifesto require a number of economic and social changes. A viewpoint submitted to the Future Market Consultation.

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