Future Markets Consultation

Towards a New Market Economy in Europe for Future Generations

Livecasts with renowned economists, an essay contest & more

Critical Reflections on Banking & Finance

Online Courses

  1. Just Money: Banking as if Society Mattered (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  2. Understanding Money: the History of Finance, Speculation and the Stock Market (University of South Hampton)
  3. Economics of Money and Banking (Columbia University)
  4. The Global Financial Crisis (Yale University)
  5. Financial Services after the Banking Crisis (UK Open University)

In the video slider trailers/lectures from some of these courses.

Articles & Blogs

Hand-picked for you from around the web + original articles published just on the Moral Markets site

Finding Virtue in the Finance Industry

“Finance can be a force for good in society but, over the past few decades, structural and behavioral changes have pushed the industry away from its mission of serving clients and supporting the economy in favor of enriching itself. At worst, financial services firms are mired in conflicts of interests, cloaked in opacity and complexity, and skewed by information asymmetry. Many of my students are keen to work in finance but concerned about being corrupted as soon as they walk into their first jobs. What can be done to restore confidence in the industry?”

A New Division between Public and Private for a Sustainable Financial System

The financial crisis of 2008, when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, caused all kinds of financial and economic problems in the United States and Europe. Things became stable after a while, but prices of houses and stocks have been breaking new records. Is the financial crisis something of the past or a problem which is going to repeat itself? And if so, how can we prevent this from happening? A viewpoint from the Sustainable Finance Lab.

Why Do Bankers Behave So Badly? They Make Too Much Money to Ask Questions

“the suspicious activity reports suggest that where there is a conflict between profit and ethical decision making, profit usually wins. I don’t think the reason for this is that all people in finance are unethical, but an industry with such a lot of cash floating around and too little regulation is likely to attract people with questionable ethics.”

How the Shadow of Slavery Still Hangs over Global Finance

“Financialisation has since taken many forms, but basic elements remain the same. It is based on uneven power relations that capture future individual obligations and make them saleable. The contracts underlying the 2008 credit crisis, for example, turned future mortgage payments into tradeable financial securities with actual present value.”

Loading
Share This