Articles & blogs on the COVID-19 crisis

Is the COVID-19 crisis an opportunity to revisit capitalism to make it more green and equitable? What will be the future and meaning of work in the post-COVID-19 economy? Does the crisis change our ideas about concepts underlying our current economy, such as on freedom and well-being? Are big companies taking their responsibility, or are they taking advantage of the crisis? And what is the ethics of online shopping in these times?

Moral Markets is hand-picking the most interesting and insightful articles and blogs on such questions from around the web. We try to make sure to include a variety of perspectives on the COVID-19 crisis, to aid your own reflection on ethics and economics.

Tag: the COVID-19 crisis

COVID-19, Technology, and Surveillance Capitalism

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, shopping, entertainment, and communication have moved online, and tech firms’ share prices have soared. In the latest installment of CoronaNomics, PS contributor J. Bradford DeLong and NYU professor Scott Galloway join The Independent’s Ben Chu and The Telegraph’s Lizzy Burden to discuss whether we are entering an era of higher productivity, or one of surveillance capitalism, monopoly power, and spiraling inequality.”

We Can Build a More Inclusive Government and Economy out of the Pandemic — This Blueprint Shows Us How

“With the country facing an uncertain economic future, the University of Sydney’s Policy Lab has brought together community and climate groups, unions and business groups to identify strategies for creating a different way of making policy and building a new economy coming out of the crisis. The product is our ‘Real Deal’ report released this week.”

Is a Job Guarantee the Answer?

“It’s no wonder that people like the idea of a job guarantee, with the government as the employer of last resort, promising a job to anyone who wants one. It would avoid the catastrophic and well-documented social, economic, political and cultural costs of long-term unemployment on families, health, life expectancy and communities. And economists love that it’s an ‘automatic fiscal stabiliser’: it increases government spending when the economy is weak by funding the guaranteed jobs, and reduces it as the economy recovers. So, if the benefits of a job guarantee are so big, what’s the problem?”

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