Future Markets Consultation

Towards a New Market Economy in Europe for Future Generations

Livecasts with renowned economists, an essay contest & more

Articles & blogs on money

Category: money

The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes

“In The Price of Peace: Money, Democracy, and the Life of John Maynard Keynes, Zachary D. Carter offers a new intellectual biography tracing the life and legacy of the influential economist, which argues that in the years since Keynes’s death, Keynesian economics has been stripped of Keynesian thought. Weaving together a dazzling array of Keynes’s private letters, journalistic works and academic research, this accessible book may help to hasten Keynes’s revival, writes Stephen Paduano.”

Money Buys Even More Happiness than It Used to

“While the old adage says that money can’t buy happiness, several studies have determined that the more your income increases, the happier you are, up until US$75,000 a year. […] But in a new analysis of more than 40,000 U.S. adults aged 30 and over, my colleague and I found an even deeper relationship between money and happiness. […] Today, money and happiness are more strongly related than they were in the past. It seems money buys more happiness than it used to. How did this happen?”

Negative Interest Rates: A Positive Thing?

When we take out a loan, we pay interest, while our savings generate interest. At least, this used to be the norm. Earlier this year however, Dutch banks announced that the interest rates on savings accounts will fall below zero in order to boost the economy. Why did this happen, and how does this affect our ideas about economics? Learn from economists Stefan Zeisberger and Ivan Boldyrev about the effects of negative interest rates, and whether this measure can save our economy, even when the corona pandemic takes its toll.

Money and Modern Life

“The centrepiece of Simmel’s work is a conceptualisation of exchange, an act between two people that produces value, a ‘third term, an ideal concept which enters into the duality but is not exhausted by it’. This irreducibility is why value can, in the form of money, take on a life of its own, which Simmel describes as ‘the reification of exchange among people, the embodiment of pure function’. Of course, no one said exchange would always be fair: as bandits and medical insurance companies know, one will pay any price to live. Nevertheless, as acts of exchange proliferate, currencies and prices rationalise and standardise value.”

Neoliberalism Has Tricked Us into Believing a Fairytale about Where Money Comes From

“The ideology of handbag economics claims that money is to be generated only through market activity and that it is always in short supply. Request for increased public expenditure is almost invariably met with the response ‘where’s the money to come from?’ When confronted by low pay in the NHS, the British prime minister, Theresa May, famously declared, ‘there is no magic money tree’. So where does money come from? And what is money anyway?”

Philosopher Alan Watts on the Difference between Money and Wealth

“What would you do if money was no object? […] Now money is a fundamental fact of our current constructed reality, even Alan Watts understood that. Barter, exchange, value, currency and what have you – there is absolutely no feasible way around it. So leave your pipe dreams and utopian visions at the door, just entertain the question at face value for now. It’s probing for something much deeper than some cheap ideological economic fix.”

Money and the Unflappable Economist

“At the beginning of May 2018, there was a brief furor over donations from Koch family-affiliated philanthropies to fund the Mercatus Institute and the newly-named Antonin Scalia School of Law at George Mason University (GMU). […] I shall argue instead that this event has more structural underpinnings, touching upon the very conception of education in relation to markets, and involve some crucial aspects of economic theory.”

Loading

Post archive