Future Markets Consultation

Towards a New Market Economy in Europe for Future Generations

Livecasts with renowed economists, an essay contest & more

Articles & Blogs on Inequality & Justice

Hand-picked for you from around the web + original content published just on the Moral Markets site

Towards an Innovative, Inclusive and Sustainable Market Economy in Europe – Starter Paper Future Markets Consultation

If we are looking for a place where the new perspectives on an economy geared toward sustainable human flourishing, an ‘economy for the common good’ can be embodied, Europe, as the continent in which the search for such an economy has always been on the agenda, seems to be the most likely candidate.

This is the starter paper for the Future Markets Consultation, which will run into the fall of 2020. The goal is to develop a new economic vision for Europe, enabling human flourishing for all in an ecologically sustainable way. You are cordially invited to participate!

Equality in the U.S. Starts with Better Jobs

“Americans are demanding a reckoning. Incidents of police brutality and structural inequities that have caused the pandemic to hit people of color especially hard are sparking calls for racial justice. The precarious conditions endured by poorly paid frontline workers who have continued to stay on the job during the pandemic have generated calls for economic justice. Each of these forms of injustice has distinct drivers, but they amplify each other and often fall hardest on the same people. As Martin Luther King, Jr. reminded us, economic and racial justice are inexorably linked.”

Fight for Economic Equality Is as Old as America Itself

“Americans are increasingly worried about the rising tide of economic inequality, as fewer control more wealth. For the origins of these concerns, commentators usually point to the Gilded Age at the end of the 19th century, when a few men gained immense wealth and power in the U.S. and workers suffered extreme poverty. But fears of great wealth and the need for economic equality go back to the country’s origins.”

Why Do Economists Have Trouble Understanding Racialized Inequalities?

“The economics profession has long been criticized for often ignoring the structural basis of racism or, in general, any form of identity-based discrimination. Is there something about the way economics is taught that makes it difficult for economists to identify and address structural racism? A survey of around 500 economists that we ran earlier this year would suggest so.”

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