Articles & Blogs, Category = Well-being & human flourishing

Category: Well-being & human flourishing

From Folkways to Institutions: Why Culture Matters for the Economy

This article discusses various economists on the relationship between culture and economics: “on our efforts to reduce poverty and spur economic growth, we can be overly consumed in debates about top-down policy tactics and the proper allocation of physical resources. Yet, (…) the distinguishing features of free and flourishing societies are more readily found at the levels of culture—attitudes, beliefs, and imagination.”

Are We Confusing Money with Well-being? New Zealand’s Leaders Believe So.

“Economists and politicians have traditionally focused on economic growth to set policy and measure how citizens fare. New Zealand has become the first country to put well-being, not growth or production, at the center of its economic policy. Calls for ‘purposeful capitalism’ are emerging in other countries, including the United States.”

The Search for an Alternative to GDP to Measure a Nation’s Progress – The New Zealand Experience

“There is consensus among New Zealand policymakers and researchers that GDP is not a good measure of a nation’s well-being. But the debate about what metric should replace GDP is ongoing. Last week’s [national] well-being budget was based on the Livings Standards Framework (LSF), a set of well-being measures that include cultural identity, environment, income and consumption, and social connections. But these provide no overall index of the nation’s performance. Our research uses the Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI). It shows that by that measure, New Zealand may be only half as well off, compared to conventional measures such as GDP.”

Redemptive Entrepreneurship: In a Globalized Economy, Who Is Our Neighbor?

“In our globalized and interconnected world, we inhabit vast networks of creative exchange with widely dispersed neighbors. This leads to real and thriving communities far and wide—a great and mysterious collaboration. But as we continue to strengthen those social bonds across economic life, how do we stay faithful and attentive to our more proximate community spheres?”

Davos: Why Measures of Economic Progress Must Consider the Quality of Work on Offer

“Davos offers a place for the rich and not-so-famous to meet and exchange views on the present and future of capitalism. […] Lip service, of course, is paid to wider social and ethical goals, but in truth the central concern is with the needs of the global economy. The worship of growth (measured by GDP) dominates proceedings. But this focus diverts attention from what are pressing problems in society. In particular, it misses the costs of work.”

Wealth Inequality Is Literally Killing Us. The Economy Should Work for Everyone

Short video with Alissa Quart, author of Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America (2018). Summary: “Economic hardship is linked to physical and psychological illness, resulting in added healthcare expenses people can’t afford. The gig economy – think Uber, Lyft, TaskRabbit, Handy – is marketed as a ‘be your own boss’ revolution, but it can be dehumanizing and dangerous; every worker is disposable. The cooperative business model can help reverse wealth inequality.”

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