Articles & Blogs, Category = Research updates

Category: Research updates

Companies Promoting Causes Can Be Accused of ‘Wokewashing’ – Allying Themselves only for Good PR

“More consumers want companies to address societal problems, including climate change and crumbling infrastructure. Additionally, more than half want to buy from brands that take stands on social issues. At the same time, consumers are increasingly skeptical about these partnerships, seeing them as marketing stunts. It’s called wokewashing.”

Finance, Class, and the Birth of Neoclassical Economics: The Marginalist Revolution Revisited

“In economic textbooks, the concept of ‘value’ is regarded as nothing more than the prevailing market price. This definition might seem self-evident, but it stands in sharp contrast to the classical theories of Adam Smith and David Ricardo, who used the notion of ‘value’ to probe beneath the surface of the market and discover objective factors that regulate economic exchanges. It was only in the late nineteenth century, when the idea of ‘marginal utility’ was first introduced into the field, that ‘value’ came to be viewed as a subjective measure that is reflected in prices.”

How Capitalism Changed American Literature

“In many cases, publishers became small parts of media conglomerates, such as CBS and News Corp. Fixation on profit raised the hackles of authors and editors, who penned screeds, held protests, and eventually created an alternative system: nonprofit publishing. […] But had this made any difference for what lay between a novel’s covers? Did conglomeration change the stories we told or how we told them? It’s a big question. Thousands of novels were published each year, more than I could read even a fair sample from to make any determinations. For help, I turned to new data science methods.”

Why States and Cities Should Stop Handing out Billions in Economic Incentives to Companies

“U.S. states and cities hand out tens of billions in taxpayer dollars every year to companies as economic incentives. These businesses are supposed to use the money, typically distributed through economic development programs, to open new facilities, create jobs and generate tax revenue. But all too often that’s not what happens, as I’ve learned after doing research on the use of tax incentives to spur economic development in cities and states across the country, particularly in Texas.”

Neoliberalism Has Tricked Us into Believing a Fairytale about Where Money Comes From

“The ideology of handbag economics claims that money is to be generated only through market activity and that it is always in short supply. Request for increased public expenditure is almost invariably met with the response ‘where’s the money to come from?’ When confronted by low pay in the NHS, the British prime minister, Theresa May, famously declared, ‘there is no magic money tree’. So where does money come from? And what is money anyway?”

Companies’ Self-Regulation Doesn’t Have to Be Bad for the Public

“If Boeing is allowed to certify that a crash-prone aircraft is safe, and Facebook can violate users’ privacy expectations, should companies and industries ever be allowed to police themselves? The debate is heating up particularly in the U.S. tech sector with growing calls to regulate – or even break up – the likes of Google, Apple and Amazon. It turns out to be possible, at least sometimes, for companies and industries to govern themselves, while still protecting the public interest.”

Five Myths about the Informal Economy That Need Debunking

“we often get asked about the ‘risks’ associated to informal economy. Doesn’t it lead to ‘losses’ for a society? Aren’t such workers ‘missing opportunities’? These questions reveal something else, however: that informality is often perceived negatively. As citizens and researchers we identified five myths we often hear on this topic.”

The Search for an Alternative to GDP to Measure a Nation’s Progress – The New Zealand Experience

“There is consensus among New Zealand policymakers and researchers that GDP is not a good measure of a nation’s well-being. But the debate about what metric should replace GDP is ongoing. Last week’s [national] well-being budget was based on the Livings Standards Framework (LSF), a set of well-being measures that include cultural identity, environment, income and consumption, and social connections. But these provide no overall index of the nation’s performance. Our research uses the Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI). It shows that by that measure, New Zealand may be only half as well off, compared to conventional measures such as GDP.”

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