By Edward Soule

book cover of morality & markets
Editions:Hardcover: € 113.00 EUR
ISBN: 978-0-7425-1358-7
Pages: 208
Paperback: € 38.00 EUR
ISBN: 978-0-7425-1359-4
Pages: 208

"Morality & Markets; The Ethics of Government Regulation poses the question: "What morally justifies government intervention in the commercial affairs of private citizens?" Its author, Edward Soule, proposes what he dubs a Regulatory Strategy, a set of rules for determining the moral legitimacy of regulation. The strategy combines the political philosophies of John Locke and John Stuart Mill with economic theory and commercial history. Soule then puts his framework into action, testing the morality of regulation in contemporary commercial disputes, including capital markets and genetically modified foods."

Reviews:Timothy P. Roth on Journal of Markets & Morality wrote:

"[...] from my economist’s perspective, a book like this is long overdue. While Edward Soule, a political philosopher, does not entirely reject the economist’s theory of the state, he regards social welfare theory (SWT) and other “monistic projects” as “incomplete and unsatisfying” theories of government regulation. I agree. [...] Edward Soule’s book is intended to alter this regulatory landscape. His Regulatory Strategy is intended to provide moral legitimacy to state intervention. [...] this book is a valuable catalyst for thought and a welcome departure from the economist’s 'monistic' regulatory strategy."


About Edward Soule

Edward SouleEdward Soule is associate professor at the Centre for Business & Public Policy, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University. His teaching and research draws upon his business career (CPA & CFO) and his training in moral philosophy. He publishes in areas where morality intersects with management, corporate strategy, and regulatory policy, and he teaches courses on managerial ethics and corporate social responsibility.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1 - A Strategy for Justifying Market Intervention
  • Chapter 2 - Competing Reasons to Regulate: Communitarian Values
  • Chapter 3 - Reasons Not To Regulate
  • Chapter 4 - United States Capital Markets
  • Chapter 5 - Agricultural Technology