Articles & Blogs on the Ethics of Markets / Economics / Business

The Reset of Capitalism (in Europe)

The Reset of Capitalism (in Europe)

We need a ‘Great Reset’ or ‘Great Reallocation’ of capitalism in which European capital is being invested in European companies, and vice versa, European companies being financed with European capital; these investment decisions resulting from a dialogue between the European wealthy and European entrepreneurs; and this process being maximally supported and promoted by national and European laws and regulations. This idea was not born from gloomy nationalism or anti-globalism, but from the conviction that a better balance is needed between global and local, between place of production and place of consumption, between mobile wealth and immobile labor, between large-scale politics and small communities, between freedom and responsibility, between short- and long-term. A viewpoint for the Future Markets Consultation submitted by Dutch think tank Socires.

Perspectives and Elections – Towards a Future-Proof and Valuable Society

Perspectives and Elections – Towards a Future-Proof and Valuable Society

With its recently published manifesto, Springtij wants to give a significant push to the shift towards a future-proof Netherlands. It is a political manifesto that is meant to be apolitical; Springtij points to ideas “that transcend party political positions. Ideas and solutions that do not divide society but strengthen it.” The Springtij manifesto is built around four ‘environments’: living & working environment, agricultural & natural environment, industrial environment, and great waters & sea. The changes described in the manifesto require a number of economic and social changes. A viewpoint submitted to the Future Market Consultation.

Transparency in the Value Chain Is a Must for Every Company!

Transparency in the Value Chain Is a Must for Every Company!

Transparency in the chain, for some companies this is their mission, but for many companies it is a complicated matter. While in developing countries, where many raw materials and/or products come from, there is a high risk of human rights violations. Understanding the chain is an important step towards transparency. To achieve this, legislation is necessary, argue Jacob van der Duijn Schouten and Jacoline de Kruijf in a viewpoint submitted to the Future Market Consultation.

The Future of Europe’s Capitalism – Podcast with Dirk Bezemer

The Future of Europe’s Capitalism – Podcast with Dirk Bezemer

In this podcast Annick van Rinsum speaks with Dirk Bezemer, professor of Economics, member of the Sustainable Finance Lab, and author of the book Een Land van Kleine Buffers [‘A Country of Small Buffers’, in Dutch]. They talk about the difference between the Rhinelandic and the Anglo-Saxon capitalist models and their effect on socio-economic outcomes, about whether there is a uniquely European capitalism at the world stage and the need to(re-)define it, and about the role of economists as social scientist to address the challenges that the future brings. This episode of the podcast series by Pakhuis de Zwijger forms the closure of a series of online dialogues that we organized with them over the past couple of months on the future of capitalism in Europe.

Karl Marx’s Life, Ideas, and Influences: A Critical Examination on the Bicentenary – Book Review

Karl Marx’s Life, Ideas, and Influences: A Critical Examination on the Bicentenary – Book Review

“In Karl Marx’s Life, Ideas, and Influences, editors Shaibal Gupta, Marcello Musto and Babak Amini bring together contributors to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Marx’s birth and to discuss the relevance of his theoretical and political legacy today. The book offers an open-minded, informative and thought-provoking collection of contributions that inspires in-depth discussions not only of past Marxian and Marxist legacies, but also of how we learn from them to act upon our present and future world, writes Janaína de Faria.”

The Neoliberal Era Is Ending. What Comes Next?

The Neoliberal Era Is Ending. What Comes Next?

“‘We’ve lived through a neoliberal era for the last 40 years, and that era is coming to an end,’ Sitaraman says, adding that the ideas and policies that defined the period are being challenged on various levels. What comes next depends on if we take a proactive and democratic approach to shaping the economy, or if we simply react to and ‘deal with’ market outcomes.”

Anti-System Politics: The Crisis of Market Liberalism in Rich Democracies – Book Review

Anti-System Politics: The Crisis of Market Liberalism in Rich Democracies – Book Review

“In Anti-System Politics: The Crisis of Market Liberalism in Rich Democracies, Jonathan Hopkin studies the political counter-movements that have arisen on the Left and the Right since the 2008 financial crisis, positioning these as forms of ‘anti-system politics’ that are a response to the failures of neoliberal orthodoxy. Scott Timcke finds this book one of the most compelling reads of 2020, deserving of serious engagement and discussion by anyone interested in politics, philosophy and economics.”

How Business Schools Can Help Corporate America Fight Racism

How Business Schools Can Help Corporate America Fight Racism

“Fighting anti-Black racism in the corporate world needs to be done in partnership with academia. After all, business schools in particular play a critical role in shaping the next generation of leaders, and Black representation (or lack thereof) in materials and faculty has an impact on not only who leads businesses but also how they lead. The authors lay out three areas.”

The Gospel of Capitalism is the Biggest Religion of All – Book Review

The Gospel of Capitalism is the Biggest Religion of All – Book Review

The latest book by Villanova University’s Eugene McCarraher, who teaches humanities, is a deep dive into the history of a perverted love story and a false religion — the western worship of money and markets. The author testifies against a creed that has dominated our lives since the 17th century and offers an imaginative look at what can help us break the spell. In the following essay, cultural historian Lynn Parramore discusses The Enchantments of Mammon: How Capitalism Became the Religion of Modernity.

The Promise and Limits of Carbon Pricing

The Promise and Limits of Carbon Pricing

“Critics and endorsers alike concede that ‘optimal’ carbon pricing schemes which are cost-efficient and environmentally effective in theory may be politically unfeasible in practice. But a ‘clash of paradigms’ persists regarding what this means in practical political terms. Windows of opportunity to pass comprehensive climate legislation are few and far between. Should governments double down on carbon pricing or diversify their policy portfolios? How big a difference does a carbon price make for the climate?”

Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems – Book Review

Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems – Book Review

“In Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems, Nobel-Prize winning economists Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo carefully lay out evidence to provide a grounded approach to tackling today’s most pressing global problems. With a focus on alleviating inequality and poverty, Banerjee and Duflo’s book clears a path for more interdisciplinary work centred on improving citizens’ wellbeing and protecting human dignity, writes Shruti Patel.”

What Does Europe’s Future Economy of the Common Good Look Like? Join Our Dialogue on Monday

What Does Europe’s Future Economy of the Common Good Look Like? Join Our Dialogue on Monday

This upcoming Monday the closing dialogue will take place of our series on the future of capitalism. Topic will be a more just and sustainable economic model for Europe, with this time four guests from four different European countries: Luis Garicano (Spain), Dalia Marin (Austria/Germany), Lucrezia Reichlin (Italy), and Geert Noels (Belgium). Can we develop a serious economic alternative for the Chinese and American model? Can we, despite the different cultures and countries we come from, find uniting ground for a European economic model? We cordially invite you to join the dialogue and submit your questions!

Also available in: Dutch

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