Future Markets Consultation

Towards a New Market Economy in Europe for Future Generations

Livecasts with renowned economists, an essay contest & more

Articles & Blogs on the Ethics of Markets / Economics / Business

What Really Matters in Markets – Recording of the Live Cast Now Available

What Really Matters in Markets – Recording of the Live Cast Now Available

The recording of our live cast on ‘what really matters in markets’ (21 September) with economist Joseph Stiglitz and politician Herman Van Rompuy is now available. The interview with Joseph Stiglitz and the interview with Herman Van Rompuy, part of the episode, are also available as separate videos. Plus a short summary of the discussion by Eefje de Gelder, coordinator of the consultation process.

The Future of Capitalism; A Series of Online Dialogues

The Future of Capitalism; A Series of Online Dialogues

Through a series of ten public online dialogues we will explore solutions and bring together researchers from around the world to rethink capitalism. How can the freedom and innovative potential of free markets be squared with the requirements of ecological sustainability and social justice as well as inclusiveness? Speakers include Elizabeth Anderson, Paul Collier, Joseph Stiglitz, Mohammed Yunus and Luigi Zingales (and others). Join us for this series of online events from September to November 2020.

What Really Matters in Markets – Livecast 21 Sept 18:30 CET

What Really Matters in Markets – Livecast 21 Sept 18:30 CET

In this dialogue we explore what the big challenges are for the long term future of the (European) market economy/economies. What are the key problems with today’s capitalism and what is needed for a change toward a new form of capitalism/market economies, that are both humanly and ecologically sustainable? Is there a possibility for a distinct European model of capitalism, that can meet these demands? With Joseph Stiglitz and Herman Van Rompuy.

Debate Series on Sustainable & Just Free Markets with Nobel Prize Winners Joseph Stiglitz & Mohammad Yunus

Debate Series on Sustainable & Just Free Markets with Nobel Prize Winners Joseph Stiglitz & Mohammad Yunus

On September 21, researchers from four Dutch universities will start an international consultation that will investigate the options for a sustainable and just free market in Europe. Central part of the consultation is a series of live casts on “The Future of Capitalism” with internationally renowned economists, including Nobel Prize winners Joseph Stiglitz and Mohammad Yunus. The series is organized in collaboration with Dutch debating center Pakhuis de Zwijger. Under the leadership of former Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende, ideas from the consultation will be bundled in a report that will be published in 2021. [Press Release]

“Systems Are Not Changed Mysteriously; They Are Transformed When There Is a Fundamental Change in Ourselves” – J. Krishnamurti

“Systems Are Not Changed Mysteriously; They Are Transformed When There Is a Fundamental Change in Ourselves” – J. Krishnamurti

Every episode of the online dialogues between visionary economists, organized as part of the Future Markets Consultation, starts off with a personal reflection by one of the members of the Consultation’s Think Tank of Young Economists. This is the reflection by Jim Surie at the start of the dialogue on ‘Economics for Change’ (14 September).

Economics for Change – Livecast 14 Sept 6:30 PM CET

Economics for Change – Livecast 14 Sept 6:30 PM CET

In this kick-off of a series of online dialogues with visionary economists we explore how economics is at the basis of incremental systematic change. How do the global financial and economic system, climate change, human consciousness and social security relate to one another? How do these systems interact and most importantly, how can we – without discarding capitalism in its entirety – transform them?

Friedman’s Principle, 50 Years Later

Friedman’s Principle, 50 Years Later

“In the mid-1980s, Milton Friedman’s view that the only social responsibility of business is to increase its profits became dominant in business and academia. Since the Great Financial Crisis, his views have increasingly been challenged. To mark the 50-year anniversary of Friedman’s influential NYT piece, we are launching a series of articles on the shareholder-stakeholder debate.”

Is a Capitalist-Socialist Economy Inevitable?

Is a Capitalist-Socialist Economy Inevitable?

“What will the economy of the future look like? To answer that we must first consider the current trajectory and the ways in which modern capitalism operates, who it benefits, and if it is sustainable. In this video, historians, economists, and authors discuss income and wealth inequality, how the American economy grew into the machine that it is today, the pillars of capitalism and how the concept has changed over time, and ways in which the status quo can, and maybe even should, change.”

The Post-Capitalist Hit of the Summer

The Post-Capitalist Hit of the Summer

“The pandemic has reinforced that which has been undermining the foundation of capitalism since 2008: the link between profit and capital accumulation. The current crisis has revealed a post-capitalist economy in which the markets for real goods and services no longer coordinate economic decision-making”, writes Yanis Varoufakis.

Is a Job Guarantee the Answer?

Is a Job Guarantee the Answer?

“It’s no wonder that people like the idea of a job guarantee, with the government as the employer of last resort, promising a job to anyone who wants one. It would avoid the catastrophic and well-documented social, economic, political and cultural costs of long-term unemployment on families, health, life expectancy and communities. And economists love that it’s an ‘automatic fiscal stabiliser’: it increases government spending when the economy is weak by funding the guaranteed jobs, and reduces it as the economy recovers. So, if the benefits of a job guarantee are so big, what’s the problem?”

How the Shadow of Slavery Still Hangs over Global Finance

How the Shadow of Slavery Still Hangs over Global Finance

“Financialisation has since taken many forms, but basic elements remain the same. It is based on uneven power relations that capture future individual obligations and make them saleable. The contracts underlying the 2008 credit crisis, for example, turned future mortgage payments into tradeable financial securities with actual present value.”

Also available in: Dutch

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