Part 3 of 5 in series "Journal of Markets & Morality"

The Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. It seeks to bring together theologians, philosophers, economists, and other scholars for dialogue concerning the morality of the marketplace. From each issue that is made open access (1 year after publication) we select some articles for you.

This time: Vol 19, No 2 (2016) – full table of contents

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Selected Articles

Catholic Social Teaching, Organizational Purpose, and the For-profit/Nonprofit Dichotomy: Exploring the Metaprofit Proposition - Cristian R. Loza Adaui & Giorgio Mion

Abstract

The emergence of organizations that cannot be clearly categorized as for-profit or nonprofit shows that this traditional boundary is blurring. Moreover, the legitimacy of some categories that have been used to describe organizational diversity and the dominant role given to profit to determine the ontology of organizations is questionable. In the encyclical letter Caritas in Veritate, Pope Benedict XVI calls for enlarging managerial reason and the way in which organizations and their nature are understood. He also remarks on the importance of institutional plurality for the development of markets and society. Based on the dialogue between Catholic social teaching and managerial sciences, this article presents the metaprofit proposition as a way to overcome the for-profit/nonprofit dichotomy and to rethink organizational purpose. Metaprofit evidences that, beyond profit, organizations have multiple and interrelated goals that constitute their final purpose and emphasize the instrumental role of profit as a means toward ulterior ends. The article concludes by presenting possible consequences and challenges of the metaprofit proposition for managerial sciences.

Cristian R. Loza Adaui and Giorgio Mion, “Catholic Social Teaching, Organizational Purpose, and the For-profit/Nonprofit Dichotomy: Exploring the Metaprofit Proposition,” Journal of Markets & Morality 19, no. 2 (Fall 2016): 275-295

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Consumerism, Marketing, and the Cardinal Virtues - Chad Engelland & Brian Engelland

Abstract

The tendency for consumers to overindulge in purchase activities has been analyzed and discussed since the time of Plato, yet consumerism in today’s marketplace has become increasingly more prominent and pernicious. In this conceptual article, we examine consumerism and discuss the four weaknesses in human nature that promote it. We then apply the four cardinal virtues—moderation, courage, justice, and prudence—and describe how these virtues can be implemented by consumers and producers so as to counteract the weaknesses and result in more effective achievement of the common good. As a result of this application, both consumer decision-making and producer marketing-action should work to promote human flourishing.

Chad Engelland and Brian Engelland, “Consumerism, Marketing, and the Cardinal Virtues,” Journal of Markets & Morality 19, no. 2 (Fall 2016): 297-315

Full Text: PDF

Augustinian Motifs in Mandeville’s Theory of Society - Joost W. Hengsmengel

Abstract

In the eighteenth century, the Dutch-born satirist Bernard Mandeville was generally associated with deism and atheism. Nowadays scholarly opinions about his theological outlook are strongly divided. Instead of reassessing what Mandeville really believed, this article focuses on three theological motifs that recur in Mandeville’s Fable of the Bees. These typically Augustinian ideas concerning the fall of man, the two faces of evil, and the distinction between worldly and real happiness deserves more attention than they have hitherto received. Even if E. G. Hundert is right that Mandeville “abandoned the Augustinian premises” of the Calvinists and the Jansenists, he clearly did not forsake all of them. I argue that the three motifs are part of a framework within which Mandeville develops his theory of man and society. Interestingly, Mandeville’s well-known thesis “private vices, public benefits” also seems to build on these Augustinian ideas.

Joost W. Hengstmengel, “Augustinian Motifs in Mandeville’s Theory of Society,” Journal of Markets & Morality 19, no. 2 (Fall 2016): 317-338

Full Text: PDF

 


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Series "Journal of Markets & Morality":

The Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. It seeks to bring together theologians, philosophers, economists, and other scholars for dialogue concerning the morality of the marketplace. From each issue that is made open access (1 year after publication) we select some articles for you.


Articles in this series:
  1. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol.18, no.2)
  2. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 19, no. 1)
  3. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 19, no. 2)
  4. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 20, no. 1)
  5. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 20, no. 2)