Part 1 of 5 in series "Journal of Markets & Morality"

The Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. It seeks to bring together theologians, philosophers, economists, and other scholars for dialogue concerning the morality of the marketplace. From each issue that is made open access (1 year after publication) we select some articles for you.

This time: Vol 18, No 2 (2015) – full table of contents

Selection from the Articles

A Value Judgment on ‘A Value Judgment on Value Judgments’ - Samuel Gregg

Abstract

Debates surrounding the place of values and morality in economics are not new. The very phrase “economic science” implies a strongly positivist dimension to economics as the study of supply and demand. Wilhelm Röpke (1899–1966), however, is one of a number of twentieth-century free market economists who explored the issue of the relationship between morality and economics in detail and in a manner that went far beyond the utility calculations to which some economists and others are inclined to reduce this question. Indeed the German title of Röpke’s most well-known work, A Humane Economy, was Jenseits von Angebot und Nachfrage [Beyond Supply and Demand] (1958). (view article)

Samuel Gregg, “A Value Judgment on ‘A Value Judgment on Value Judgments’”, Journal of Markets & Morality 18, no. 2 (Fall 2015): 483-495.

A Value Judgment on Value Judgments (1941) - Wilhelm Röpke

Abstract

Economics is full of problems which seem to find no rest. They are being turned over again and again and seen now in this light, now in another. Problems of this sort are such which do not admit of any dogmatic answer in one sense or another. Instead, they seem to demand solutions which follow some “reasonable middle course” and which are embroidered by a number of variable qualifications and reserves.To this group of problems belongs the question of the scientific legitimacy of judgments of value. It has so long and so feverishly been discussed that it appears tedious to make any attempt to stir up the discussion again. Recent personal experiences, however, suggest that a fairly general consensus on a dangerously dogmatic answer has become crystallized in our academic world, a dogmatism which is not far from being a real impediment in our academic activities. To a great number of social scientists it seems to be beyond any possible dispute that every judgment on what ought to be in economic life must be scientifically illegitimate. For them the question appears to be settled once and for all while in our view it is and will remain an extremely delicate and intricate problem. (view article)

Wilhelm Röpke, “A Value Judgment on Value Judgments (1941)”, Journal of Markets & Morality 18, no. 2 (Fall 2015): 497–514.

Virtuous Poverty, Christian Liberty: A Free-Market Appreciation of Pope Francis - Oskari Juurikkala

Abstract

Pope Francis has touched on economic issues in many public statements and documents since his elevation to the papacy. These statements have received heavy criticism by supporters of the free market, worsened by misleading representations in mainstream media. In response, this article is divided into three sections: (1) an outline of key ideas in Francis’s message concerning the economy, (2) an analysis of certain critical responses that are relevant but ultimately insufficient, and (3) an examination of the deeper unity between free-market economics and Francis’s message.(view article)

Oskari Juurikkala, “Virtuous Poverty, Christian Liberty: A Free-Market Appreciation of Pope Francis,” Journal of Markets & Morality 18, no. 2 (Fall 2015): 257-277.

Luther’s Use of Aristotle in the Three Estates and Its Implications for Understanding Oeconomia - Timothy Shaun Price

Abstract

This article seeks to tease out the relation between Martin Luther’s concept of oeconomia in comparison to the biblical concept of oikonomia and the same concept in Aristotle. Section 1 lays the groundwork by examining Aristotle’s usage of oikonomia. Section 2 brings this into dialogue with Luther’s use of oeconomia in his “Exposition of Psalm 127.” The article concludes by reflecting on what benefit there is in Luther’s use of Aristotle for the development of oeconomia.(view article)

Timothy Shaun Price, “Luther’s Use of Aristotle in the Three Estates and Its Implications for Understanding Oeconomia,” Journal of Markets & Morality 18, no. 2 (Fall 2015): 373-389.

 


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Series "Journal of Markets & Morality":

The Journal of Markets & Morality is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. It seeks to bring together theologians, philosophers, economists, and other scholars for dialogue concerning the morality of the marketplace. From each issue that is made open access (1 year after publication) we select some articles for you.


Articles in this series:
  1. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol.18, no.2)
  2. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 19, no. 1)
  3. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 19, no. 2)
  4. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 20, no. 1)
  5. Journal of Markets & Morality (vol. 20, no. 2)